Tag Archives: Mismatch

An Evolutionary Explanation For Why You Wear Glasses

Empirically testing health-related hypotheses formulated through an evolutionary lens can prove to be difficult. The environment and the human experience are radically different from the first 6 million years of human evolution. Living on the edge of human existence and the top end of the techno-scientific scale, we are far removed from the environment to which many of our genes are hypothesized to be properly suited. Fortunately, the human race is a diverse group of individuals who have dispersed across the globe and have acclimated to a variety of circumstances. Accordingly, a few hunter-gatherer societies remain in parts of Africa. Though neither their genes nor their cultures are identical to original hunter-gatherers, they do retain the closest genetic and sociocultural similarity to human ancestors in the modern world. This is not to say that they are “less evolved” than other human societies. This notion is elementary and indicative of evolutionary ignorance. They are very well suited for their habitat, both genetically and culturally. Fortunately, those of us who are less suited for our environments, both genetically and culturally (i.e., everyone else, particularly in the US), can glean incredible insights about the functioning our own bodies and to what dietary and daily circumstances our physiology is best suited.

I recently wrote a primer on evolutionary medicine (which can be found here), which might be beneficial to read before getting into the specifics. This post will focus on myopia, or “near-sightedness,” the visual condition where objects at a distance are out of focus. Myopia affects about 15% of Africans, a third of Americans and Europeans, and over 75% of Asians – a curious bias that I’ll address later in the article. Fortunately (sort-of), myopia is easy to treat with glasses or contacts, and can even be cured to some extent with Laser-Assisted in situ Keratomileusis, commonly known as LASIK. Myopia occurs when the eye is too long, causing the focal point of light to occur prematurely, resulting in a blurry image. As a result, corrective lenses refract the light before it hits the cornea, essentially “overshooting” the refraction. For example, myopic corrective lenses will be thicker on the sides and thinner in the middle, causing the light to spread out slightly more before it hits the cornea, ultimately moving the focal point further back in the eyeball. With LASIK, a high frequency laser is used to vaporize (note: no heat is used. The vaporization is due to the light wavelength) tissue on the center of the cornea, thus reshaping the cornea so that light will be correctly refracted.

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In order to focus, the eye depends on ciliary muscles that are attached to the lens. When focusing on something far away, as would often be the case outdoors, the ciliary muscles contract, stretching the lens to a flattened shape. When focusing on something up close, such as a book, television, computer, or phone, the muscles relax, allowing the lens to become more concave. Think of a camera lens: to focus on something far away, you use a longer lens or zoom in. Doing this moves the focal point of distant objects further back, allowing them to be in focus. To take up-close shots you use a macro lens, which is a very short, rounded lens that moves the focal point for near objects closer to the lens. This is how the eye works. Myopia is what happens when your zoom function is broken. Evolution and an analysis of our current sociocultural context might be able to tell us why this happens.

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I’m a student, and spend a lot of my time looking at a book, a laptop, or a phone. I love to get outside when I can, but, ultimately, most of my time is spent looking at things up-close. That means that the ciliary muscles in my eye – the zoom muscles – spend most of their time relaxed. Just like any other muscle that goes unused, the ciliary muscle will likely begin to atrophy and become weaker (as far as I’m aware, no quantitative studies have been performed on ciliary muscle size or mitochondrial count, probably because this would be difficult or impossible to do on a living person. Perhaps future studies can examine the ciliary muscles of recently deceased individuals and compare individuals who suffered from myopia with individuals who had normal vision). Over time, particularly if it occurs throughout critical stages of development during childhood, the muscles may become to weak to contract and properly pull the lens flat, thus preventing you from being able to focus on distant objects. Of course, this begs the question of whether or not the muscle be strengthened. I don’t know, and I’m not sure that I am willing to find out by using myself as a guinea pig. Unfortunately, that makes me part of the problem of “dysevolution,” as coined by Harvard paleoanthropologist and human evolutionary biologist, Daniel Lieberman. Dysevolution refers to the circle of treating diseases without trying to change or fix the cause. Our technology and scientific understanding has advanced so rapidly in the past 100 years that we can fix things such as myopia with ease. Often this cycle is perpetuated by comfort. Why change what the way I do things when I can just buy contacts or glasses? My previous post mentions several other possible mismatch diseases, and Lieberman’s book, “The Story of the Human Body,” goes into detail about many of them. For many of them – if not most – we simply ignore the possible cures and instead opt for a more “comfortable” and easy treatment. However, this cycle is sure to grow and intensify as time goes on.

Evolutionary medicine is sometimes difficult to empirically test. However, as mentioned above, modern day hunter-gatherer societies can offer incredible insight and points of comparison for how sociocultural differences may affect our “mismatch diseases.” Studies of this kind are unfortunately few and far between (possibly because research funding also focuses on treatments). However, studies with hunter-gatherer societies have shown that very few members suffer from myopia (as well as many other non-infectious ailments, such as type-2 diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and even cavities). The thought is that they are exposed to a variety of visual stimuli and their visual environment is constantly changing. This “exercises” their ciliary muscles and keeps them strong. Experiments have also shown that animals that are deprived of visual stimuli will grow elongated eyeballs. Similarly, people who spend more time indoors, particularly with studying, as is common in many Asian cultures, exhibit much higher instances of myopia whereas those who spend some time outdoors, as is more common in many African cultures, tend to have a lower rate of myopia. Our eyes did not evolve to see things 2 feet from our face all day long. They evolved to keep up alive from the plethora of visual stimuli in nature and to help us search for food: 2 things that many people, particularly children in developed countries, no longer need to do.

The solution isn’t to give up studying and electronics. It’s much more simple than that. Nearly everyone uses books and electronics, so why doesn’t everyone have myopia? One possibility is genetics, though that doesn’t seem like a plausible explanation. Rates of myopia have only skyrocketed in the last century, and any latent mutation for poor vision would have most certainly been selected against in our ancestors. The likely “cure” for myopia is balance. Spend time outside, especially as a child. The data from lab experiments as well as social statistics seem to point in this direction. If we continue to ignore the cause and only treat the symptoms, we are trapping ourselves in an ever growing cycle in which we become more and more dependent upon technology.

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